Comments for Classic Cinema Images http://classiccinemaimages.com Classic Images From The Golden Era Of Hollywood And Beyond Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:07:37 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Comment on Doris Day is the top female box office star of all time by Elizabeth Andrews http://classiccinemaimages.com/doris-day/doris-day/#comment-5763 Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:07:37 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=331#comment-5763 I can remember watching Doris Day while I was growing up, I loved her with Rock Hudson. Her movies were always so entertaining . Doris was a super star and her music was the best in my era. Such a glorious women and he earned her title up there with the top ten. Thank you Doris Day for such great memories. While I was growing up I learned a lot from you!!
All my love,
Liz

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Comment on Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall Wedding – May 21, 1945 by The Black Cyclone | Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Blog http://classiccinemaimages.com/humphrey-bogart/bogie-and-bacall/#comment-5638 Tue, 14 Oct 2014 12:54:15 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=1645#comment-5638 […] It’s a fascinating story and a wonderful play.  Malabar Farms, the venue where I watched the show, is equally enchanting, a true gem of central Ohio:  the working farm and former home of Louis Bromfield, an author and screenwriter as well as a man truly devoted to sustainable agriculture.  Malabar Farms is simply beautiful, and is perhaps best known as the place where Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall (who died earlier this year) were married. […]

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Comment on Hayley Mills reached stardom as a child actor in the early ’60s by Random Post – Hayley Mills | Copine 1 and 2 http://classiccinemaimages.com/hayley-mills/hayley-mills/#comment-5478 Tue, 09 Sep 2014 15:56:42 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=405#comment-5478 […] http://classiccinemaimages.com/hayley-mills/hayley-mills/ […]

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Comment on Doris Day on the set of “Calamity Jane” (1953) by Calamity Jane (1953) | The Blonde at the Film http://classiccinemaimages.com/doris-day/doris-day-on-the-set-of-calamity-jane-1953/#comment-5310 Mon, 11 Aug 2014 00:19:28 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=7476#comment-5310 […] via: http://classiccinemaimages.com/doris-day/doris-day-on-the-set-of-calamity-jane-1953/ […]

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Comment on Bathing Beauties: Virginia Mayo by ricky http://classiccinemaimages.com/bathing-beauties/bathing-beauties-virginia-mayo/#comment-5274 Fri, 01 Aug 2014 16:15:01 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=3543#comment-5274 I was very sorry when I learned such a beatifull Hollywood Star has died. I ejoyed her movie carrer very much and I dilighted with her figure and beautiness

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Comment on She’s Got Legs: Alexis Smith by Spirit http://classiccinemaimages.com/shes-got-legs-2/shes-got-legs-alexis-smith/#comment-5165 Wed, 16 Jul 2014 02:01:22 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=3359#comment-5165 She was something else – something special. “Old Hollywood” was able through the Star System to bring us personalities that resounded (as opposed to getting arrested). But outside of that, you got women (not girls) Like Nina Foch, Dina Merrill and others who always brought class to every role they played. And in some cases – like Alexis – you got legs. She had ‘em’. Even in her 60’s and 70’s she was doing stage work where she flashed those gams. Think any of the “actresses” of the 80’s and 90’s will be doing roles in a negligee and heels in their 60’s? I doubt it…

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Comment on Olive Thomas by Michele http://classiccinemaimages.com/jack-pickford/olive-thomas/#comment-5086 Sun, 06 Jul 2014 06:14:45 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=4614#comment-5086 Lovely images of Olive Thomas. The last one is actually from her very first film, “Beatrice Fairfax: Playball” (1916), and the man is her co-star, Nigel Barrie, not Jack Pickford (unfortunately, there are very few images of Olive and Jack together).

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Comment on Faces: Ingrid Bergman by Junior http://classiccinemaimages.com/ingrid-bergman/faces-ingrid-bergman/#comment-4938 Sun, 01 Jun 2014 21:21:30 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=3823#comment-4938 Yes

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Comment on Margaret Sullavan a stage and Hollywood film actress by Margaret Sullavan made sixteen movies during her Hollywood career http://classiccinemaimages.com/margaret-sullavan/margaret-sullavan/#comment-4819 Mon, 19 May 2014 02:57:49 +0000 http://classiccinemaimages.com/?p=3296#comment-4819 […] Margaret Sullavan was born May 16, 1909 in Norfolk, Virginia to Cornelius Sullavan, a wealthy stockbroker, and his wife, Garland Brooke. Sullavan attended boarding school at Chatham Episcopal Institute (now Chatham Hall), where she was president of the student body and delivered the salutary oration in 1927. Sullavan moved to Boston and lived with her half-sister, Weedie, where she studied dance at the Boston Denishawn studio and (against her parents’ wishes) drama at the Copley Theatre. When her parents cut her allowance to a minimum, she defiantly paid her way as a clerk in the Harvard Cooperative Bookstore (The Coop), located in Harvard Square, Cambridge. Sullavan began her acting career onstage in early 1929 in a Harvard Dramatic Society musical production entitled Close Up. In the summer of 1929 she made her debut on the professional stage appearing opposite Henry Fonda in The Devil in the Cheese. Sullavan made her debut on Broadway in A Modern Virgin (a comedy by Elmer Harris), on May 20, 1931. After appearing in several Broadway productions Sullavan replaced another actor in Dinner at Eight in March of 1933. Movie director John M. Stahl happened to be watching the play and decided Sullavan would be perfect for a picture he was planning, “Only Yesterday” (1933). Sullavan had already turned down offers from Paramount and Columbia for five-year contracts, but when Stahl offered her a three-year, two-pictures-a-year contract with MGM at $1,200 a week, she accepted it and had a clause put in her contract that allowed her to return to the stage on occasion. Sullavan would continue to only sign short-term contracts because she did not want to be “owned” by any studio. After making “Only Yesterday” Sullavan would go on to make only sixteen movies during her Hollywood acting career, four of which were opposite James Stewart including the popular classic “The Shop Around the Corner” (1940) and “Three Comrades” (1938) for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance. Sullavan’s other movies of note include the profitable and successful WWII drama “Cry Havoc” in 1943 and “Back Street” (1941) which was lauded as one of the best performances of Sullavan’s Hollywood career. Sullavan retired from the screen after making “Cry Havoc”, but returned in 1950 to make her last movie, “No Sad Songs for Me” (1950), in which she plays a woman who is dying of cancer. For the rest of her career Margaret Sullavan would only appear on the stage appearing in several shows on Broadway and in London, England. […]

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Comment on About by art http://classiccinemaimages.com/about/#comment-4815 Sun, 18 May 2014 20:27:22 +0000 http://testing.quickinstall.com/w1/wordpress/?page_id=2#comment-4815 Hi Anne,
I don’t own the rights to the picture in question, so I can’t give ‘permission’ for someone to use it. But I’m pretty sure it would be OK for you use the pic for a class project… Good luck!!
Thanks for visiting Classic Cinema Images!! :)
-art-

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